Books on Chemistry, Physiology and Mathematics does not supply the best content for a book review, and that is what I’ve been reading lately, but luckily I’ve managed to squeeze in the time for a not purely academic book.

This time the book is Thinking, Fast and Slow, by Professor of Psychology and Nobel prize winner in Economics, Daniel Kahneman. In Thinking, Fast and Slow, Kahneman takes us on a journey through our own mind, or more specifically he explains the two systems that drive the way we think. Kahneman calls them System 1 and System 2.

  • System 1 = The instant, unconscious, automatic, emotional, intuitive thinking.
  • System 2 = The slower, conscious, rational, reasoning, deliberate thinking.

Kahneman exposes the extraordinary capabilities and also the faults and biases of fast thinking, and reveals the pervasive influence of intuitive impressions on our thoughts and behavior.

The impact of loss aversion and overconfidence on corporate strategies, the difficulties of predicting what will make us happy in the future, the challenges of properly framing risks at work and at home, the profound effect of cognitive biases on everything from playing the stock market to planning the next vacation, each of these can be understood only by knowing how the two systems work together to shape our judgments and decisions.

Engaging the reader in a lively conversation about how we think, Kahneman reveals where we can and cannot trust our intuitions and how we can tap into the benefits of slow thinking. He offers practical and enlightening insights into how choices are made in both business and our personal lives, and how we can use different techniques to guard against the mental glitches that often get us into trouble.

We humans are not as rational as we like to think, but Thinking, Fast and Slow will at least supply you with the mental tools and knowledge to become a more rational being.

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Books on Chemistry, Physiology and Mathematics does not supply the best content for a book review, and that is what I’ve been reading lately, but luckily I’ve managed to squeeze in the time for a not purely academic book. This time the book is Thinking, Fast and Slow, by Professor...